My Grandfather’s Cameras

Part 4: Kodak Tourist

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Warner on a pier in Tomales Bay, Calif.

This is part 4 of an on-going series
titled "My Grandfather's Cameras."
I never met my paternal grandfather,
Robert Diefenbach.
He passed away in 1969.
His small collection of cameras sat
in a basement for 45 years until
they were handed down to me in the
spring of 2014, still loaded with film.
Read more in Part 1: Argus C4, Part 2: Argus C3
and Part 3: Kodak Retina

This Kodak Tourist is not one of my grandfather’s cameras. It is actually my grandfather-in-law’s camera. Walter LaMar handed it down to my wife’s late father, Daniel Stromska, then to her mother, then to me. I am very honored to be the current bearer of this early, post-war, simple machine.

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My Grandfather’s Cameras

Part 3: Kodak Retina

 

My father, Bill Diefenbach, son of Robert Diefenbach the previous owner of this Kodak Retina from the 1930's. My dad is lounging in one of our favorite places, Tamalas Bay in Northern California.

My father, Bill Diefenbach, son of Robert Diefenbach, the previous owner of the Kodak Retina. My dad is lounging in one of our favorite places, Tamalas Bay in Northern California.

This is part 3 of an on-going series
titled "My Grandfather's Cameras."
I never met my paternal grandfather,
Robert Diefenbach.
He passed away in 1969.
His small collection of cameras sat
in a basement for 45 years until
they were handed down to me in the
spring of 2014, still loaded with film.
Read more in Part 1: Argus C4 and Part 2: Argus C3
Robert Diefenbach's 1935 Kodak Retina

Robert Diefenbach’s 1935 Kodak Retina

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Troop 14: Philmont

Alumni of scouting are often asked two questions. 1) Did you make Eagle? 2) Did you go to Philmont.
This is the latter.

Philmont Scout Ranch is the most extreme adventure the Boy Scouts of America have to offer. Troop 14′s itinerary spanned 100 miles and 5 peaks totaling well over 10,000 feet of total climbing. For 12 days, the boys traversed sometimes treacherous terrain, compounded by sore and blister-riddled feet. Going into the trip, a few parents had their doubts concerning their son’s (or their own) abilities.

Everyone was tested. And everyone made it.

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Serendipity School

Serendipity School is an amazing place where students tinker with wires and batteries, get their hands messy with paint, and don’t spend all day sitting in a desk. I recently had the fantastic opportunity to immerse myself at Serendipity for several days of a marketing shoot for the school. The administrators and I felt it was important not to stage anything so not to disrupt their students’ education. But also, unscripted is how I prefer roll.

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The Jungle is Torn Down

300 or so men, women and some children were recently pushed out of a San Jose homeless encampment aptly named “The Jungle.”

I was sent on assignment by Reuters, but by then time I got down to the site’s location near the heart of Silicon Valley, everyone had been kicked out and the clean up crew had already begun their task. I was able to find a way back into the jungle and came across a handful of homeless people who had snuck back in to reclaim some of their belongings, but also search for treasures left behind by others.

Below, Anna Haynes bathes herself in some of her drinking water before taking her cart out of the Jungle.

Homeless encampment occupant Anna Haynes pours water on herself as authorities break down massive homeless encampment known as "The Jungle"  in San Jose, California

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My Grandfather’s Cameras

Part 2: Argus C3

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Sarah making something delicious in our kitchen, photographed on my grandfather’s Argus C3 from the 1950′s. Although designed in the 1930′s, this particular model is about 15 years younger.

This is part 2 of an on-going series titled "My Grandfather's Cameras." I never met my paternal grandfather, Bob Diefenbach. He passed away in 1969. His small collection of cameras sat  in a basement for 45 years until they were handed down to me  in the spring of 2014, still loaded with film. Read more in   Part 1: Argus C4

The state in which my grandfather’s cameras were handed down to me is impressive. Granted, none of the cameras had been touched since 1969, but even then, it is clear that Bob Diefenbach took great care of his photography equipment. My grandfather treated these cameras like new, even though the Argus C3 was particularly obsolete even at the time he was using it.

The Argus C3 was made for nearly 20 years, which is incredible. It is hard to imagine any of today’s technology being relevant or sold for two decades.

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Based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Argus’ C3 was the most produced camera ever in its day with 2 million units sold.

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